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Dating work colleagues advice

dating work colleagues advice-31

Other options: Speak with the office manager or an office administrator, urges Lenkov, or suggest your superior send an office-wide email reminding everyone to observe and respect the company's code of conduct.

" This should start a dialogue in which you can offer an alternative.New York City-based Executive Recruiter Patricia H.Lenkov asks what's on all of our minds: "How is it that he has so much free time on his hands?!Instead of doing his grunt work, offer to show him how it's done so he can do it himself next time.The Finger Pointer Whether a deadline's been missed or a job's been botched, The Finger Pointer is the first to announce exactly who's to blame: anyone but her.When he (predictably) bristles at the idea of something new, ask him to come up with a solution, so the conversation becomes about what you can do instead of what you can't.

Miss No Manners Maybe you can hear her chewing (or chomping gum or playing music) through the cubicle wall, or perhaps she cooks smelly foods in the office microwave and leaves sloppy leftovers in the shared fridge—whatever workplace etiquette rules you swear by, Miss No Manners is likely to break them.

You can also lead by example by commending the entire team—"Client X signed on with our group"—instead of taking all the credit with a first-person statement, such as "I wrangled Client X into signing on." Lastly, it can help to encourage the non-self-promoters to speak up, so The Spotlight Stealer doesn't get to play "the hero" every time.

The Office Lingerer As much as you appreciate your company's open-door policy, when The Office Lingerer stops by to ask a question, then settles in and starts telling you all about his day, it's so frustrating you wish you could put a lock on your door.

Unfortunately, this means you get less done because you're constantly waiting for her to be available.

Develop a rapport with her, suggests Susan Zeidman, a portfolio manager at American Management Association who is responsible for many of her company's communications and management training programs.

If you're comfortable speaking up, it's completely appropriate to ask her to stop her annoying behavior, says Lenkov.