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Internet dating scams us military

internet dating scams us military-27

Dating and romance scams often take place through online dating websites, but scammers may also use social media or email to make contact.They have even been known to telephone their victims as a first introduction.

Army Criminal Investigation Command are warning the American public to be vigilant of Internet scams and impersonation fraud -- especially those promising true love, but only end up breaking hearts and bank accounts. These scams are outright theft and fraud and are a grave misrepresentation of the U. Army and the tremendous amount of support programs and mechanisms that exist for Soldiers today, especially those serving overseas, said Grey. The perpetrators often tell the victims that their units do not have telephones or they are not allowed to make calls or they need money to Aca,! Often times the company exists, but has no idea or is not a part of the scam. Ac Be aware of common spelling, grammatical or language errors in the emails. A"These perpetrators, often from other countries, most notably from Ghana, Angola and Nigeria, are good at what they do and quite familiar with American culture, but the claims about the Army and its regulations are ridiculous, Aca,! Photographs and actual names of servicemembers have been the only thing utilized. Internet or not, servicemembers always appreciate a letter in the mail. Ac Be extremely suspicious if you are asked for money for transportation costs, communication fees or marriage processing and medical fees. Ac Many of the negative claims made about the military and the supposed lack of support and services provided to troops overseas are far from reality -- check the facts. Ac Be very suspicious if you are asked to send money or ship property to a third party or company.The Army reports that numerous very senior officers and enlisted Soldiers throughout the Army have had their identities stolen to be used in these scams.

To date, there have been no reports to Army CID indicating any U. service members have suffered any financial loss as a result of these attacks, according to CID.

servicemen, routinely serving in Iraq or Afghanistan.

The scams include asking the victim to send money, often thousands of dollars at a time, to a third party address so the phone or laptop can be purchased for the Soldier.

They often say they are widowers and raising a young child on their own to pull on the heartstrings of their victims.

"We've even seen where the criminals said that the Army won't allow the Soldier to access their personal bank accounts or credit cards," he added. "These perpetrators, often from other countries, most notably from West African countries, are good at what they do and quite familiar with American culture, but the claims about the Army and its regulations are ridiculous," said Grey.

The scams include asking the victim to send money, often thousands of dollars at a time, to a third party address.