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These other coins are more fully described in Coins of the United States dollar. dollar may therefore be described as the unit of account of the United States. Section 9 of that act authorized the production of various coins, including "DOLLARS OR UNITS—each to be of the value of a Spanish milled dollar as the same is now current, and to contain three hundred and seventy-one grains and four sixteenth parts of a grain of pure, or four hundred and sixteen grains of standard silver".The Constitution provides that "a regular Statement and Account of the Receipts and Expenditures of all public Money shall be published from time to time". The word "dollar" is one of the words in the first paragraph of Section 9 of Article I of the Constitution. Section 20 of the act provided, "That the money of account of the United States shall be expressed in dollars, or units... In addition to the dollar the coinage act officially established monetary units of mill or one-thousandth of a dollar (symbol ₥), cent or one-hundredth of a dollar (symbol ¢), dime or one-tenth of a dollar, and eagle or ten dollars, with prescribed weights and composition of gold, silver, or copper for each.

When currently issued in circulating form, denominations equal to or less than a dollar are emitted as U. coins while denominations equal to or greater than a dollar are emitted as Federal Reserve notes (with the exception of gold, silver and platinum coins valued up to $100 as legal tender, but worth far more as bullion).The lion dollar was popular in the Dutch New Netherland Colony (New York), but the lion dollar also circulated throughout the English colonies during the 17th century and early 18th century. dollar was first defined by the Coinage Act of 1792, which specified a "dollar" to be based in the Spanish milled dollar and of 371 grains and 4 sixteenths part of a grain of pure or 416 grains (27.0 g) of standard silver and an "eagle" to be 247 and 4 eighths of a grain or 270 grains (17 g) of gold (again depending on purity).Examples circulating in the colonies were usually worn so that the design was not fully distinguishable, thus they were sometimes referred to as "dog dollars". The choice of the value 371 grains arose from Alexander Hamilton's decision to base the new American unit on the average weight of a selection of worn Spanish dollars.The United States dollar (sign: $; code: USD; also abbreviated US$ and referred to as the dollar, U. dollar, or American dollar) is the official currency of the United States and its insular territories per the United States Constitution since 1792. Since the suspension in 1971 Besides the United States, it is also used as the sole currency in two British Overseas Territories in the Caribbean: the British Virgin Islands and Turks and Caicos Islands. The Sacagawea dollar is one example of the copper alloy dollar.For most practical purposes, it is divided into 100 smaller cent (¢) units, but officially it can be divided into 1000 mills (₥). A few countries use the Federal Reserve Notes for paper money, while still minting their own coins, or also accept U. The pure silver dollar is known as the American Silver Eagle.The term eagle was used in the Coinage Act of 1792 for the denomination of ten dollars, and subsequently was used in naming gold coins. Joachim's Valley, now Jáchymov; then part of the Kingdom of Bohemia, now part of the Czech Republic).

Paper currency less than one dollar in denomination, known as "fractional currency", was also sometimes pejoratively referred to as "shinplasters". Joachimstaler was later shortened to the German Taler, a word that eventually found its way into Danish and Swedish as daler, Norwegian as dalar and daler, Dutch as daler or daalder, Ethiopian as ታላሪ (talari), Hungarian as tallér, Italian as tallero, and English as dollar.

The suffix "K" or "k" (from "kilo-") is also commonly used to denote this amount (such as "$10k" to mean $10,000).

However, the $1,000 note is no longer in general use.

The infrequently-used $2 note is sometimes called "deuce", "Tom", or "Jefferson" (after Thomas Jefferson). The dollar has also been referred to as a "bone" and "bones" in plural (e.g. The newer designs, with portraits displayed in the main body of the obverse (rather than in cameo insets), upon paper color-coded by denomination, are sometimes referred to as "bigface" notes or "Monopoly money". Calling the dollar a piastre is still common among the speakers of Cajun French and New England French. dollars in the French-speaking Caribbean islands, most notably Haiti. The sign was the result of a late 18th-century evolution of the scribal abbreviation "p" for the peso, the common name for the Spanish dollars that were in wide circulation in the New World from the 16th to the 19th centuries.

Modern French uses dollar for this unit of currency as well. The symbol $, usually written before the numerical amount, is used for the U. These Spanish pesos or dollars were minted in Spanish America, namely in Mexico City; Potosí, Bolivia; and Lima, Peru.

These Pillars of Hercules on the silver Spanish dollar coins take the form of two vertical bars (||) and a swinging cloth band in the shape of an "S".