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Physical boundaries in christian dating relationships

Social groups of any size are seldom uniform things.

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The member/non-member distinction that is afforded by drawing an identity boundary applies not only to individuals, but also to social groups.In this very social vision of therapy, groups of people operating as units are the proper client to which therapists must address their efforts.Individuals exist, but problems they experience are not individual but rather are social in nature.I covered psychodynamic, behavioral and cognitive-behavioral contributions in past months, and also the importance of non-technical aspects of psychotherapy.According to my plan for how all of this gets laid out there are two more key therapy schools to cover, these being the Family Systems and Humanist schools.This is to say that the act of drawing the boundary itself provides the basis for saying that one person is separate from another psychologically, but does so only by drawing a distinction between those two people, which implies a relationship, never the less.

Self cannot exist without also "Not-self" existing, just as figure cannot exist without ground against which to contrast.

Accordingly, we should start by talking about what it means to be ecological.

To be ecological means to understand that creatures that appear to be independent beings aren't really independent at all, but rather are fundamentally interdependent on one another and on their shared environment for their continued survival.

Though individual species are distinct in form, they exist in context of a "whole cloth" community of species no part of which can be unraveled without unraveling the rest.

Though individual clinicians have grasped the intrinsically social and ecological nature of identity since the early days of therapy (e.g., Freud's idea of Transference, and contributions of lesser known but nevertheless important psychodynamic clinicians such as Harry Stack Sullivan), it was not until the 1950s and 60s that an organized and fully ecological vision of psychotherapy took shape in the form of what is today called Family Systems theory.

The term originated within the field of Biology when the study of living systems such as oceans, forests and prairies revealed how inseparably interlinked many species are. Flowers require bees to pollinate for them so that they can reproduce, while bees require flower pollen for food, or whatever it is that they do with pollen.